Top Five Ag Blogs for the Beginning Farmer

By Catholic Rural Life on July 13, 2015

Ethical Food and Agriculture

Just starting to till the land? Whether your looking at a city garden or a hundred acres, these are some blogs you should check out to learn more!

It was no small task coordinating this list. I mean, how does one determine what is an exceptional blog? Is it the aesthetic? The content? The theme? Or maybe what the specific blogger raises or grows and where?

I attempted to create a cross section of blogs that represented American agriculture in all of its diversity and beauty! I scoured the web, assembling a league of extraordinary blogs to aid in your search of a more perfect knowledge of agriculture and all it has to offer in all its variety.

With that being said, let’s begin!

1. Frugal Table: Living a rich life frugally

This simple blog has some mighty input to the authenticity that farm life can offer. Based out of a Screen shot 2015-07-10 at 3.03.42 PMKentucky farm that is home to a few cows, pigs, and chickens, this blogger describes her beautiful life in a series of posts that are easy to read and give a variety of viewpoints on farming. As the title would insinuate, this blogger’s commitment is to a low cost but creative living. The blogger herself is a suburbanite transplant, and loves sharing her and her husband’s stories of the farm.

2. Iowa Agriculture Literacy 

This blog stuck out to us for their purpose of describing rural life to people who are interested and new to the agrarian lifestyle. Due to the vastness of agriculture, even the most seasoned farmer/rancher could learn a few things from this blog! Their motto is “Educating Iowans on the breadth and global significance of agriculture.” Which is something Catholic Rural Life can definitely get behind!

Screen shot 2015-07-09 at 2.14.54 PM

3. National Young Farmers Coalition

What an awesome idea for an organization! Their mission is to “represent, mobilize, and engage young farmers to ensure their success”–talk about the betterment of rural America! The blogs represent young farmers all over the US and keeps it relevant with tips on stewardship and conservation! Not to mention their concern with federal public policy, which concerns all Americans. Check out their campaign to support young farmers by adding farming to the list of public services that can gain student loan forgiveness.

4. New Catholic Land Movement

The New Catholic Land Movement is dedicated (in part) to assisting Catholic families and individuals Screen shot 2015-07-10 at 3.00.21 PMonto the farm land, training Catholic families and individuals in the arts of farming, and publishing texts relating to Catholic culture and rural life. Wow, if that doesn’t spell Catholic Rural Life, I don’t know what does. We actually have done a feature on this movement before, and let’s just say, we are big fans.

5. Farmgirl Follies

If you are looking for a creative and engaging blog that gives you recipes along with Christian spiritual Screen shot 2015-07-10 at 3.05.33 PMfodder, you have to check out this blog! Residing in Ohio, Jennifer Kiko describes her life on her family’s seven generation farm that has fresh fruits, veggies, and some cattle as well. It is a beautiful site that is easy and fun to read, but also has amazing pictures and promotes the rural life on the whole!

 

Bonus!

Learn more about Early Morning Farms which is a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture ) based in New York state. Their motto is: “To Grow Fresh, Organic Food and Strengthen our Local Community of Eaters.” Give them a click!

 

 

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